Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Wildflower Wednesday - June 28, 2017

"One person's weed is another person's wildflower."
Susan Wittig Albert

 All flowers must have been wildflowers at one time and still are in some part of the world. So, here are some of the "wildflowers" that are blooming right now in Massachusetts zone 6B.

I love this Silene. It's such a beautiful shade of pink and spreads itself out around other plants so that the flowers pop up in unexpected places. What kind it is, I have no idea but, if you look at it in the picture below, you can see that it has a bladder.



Gaillardia is blooming away and will be for most of the summer and fall. It has seeded itself in various parts of the garden and makes a nice splash of color wherever it settles.

There are three kinds of Yarrow growing in the big garden now...I'm very excited about that. The above picture is Common Yarrow which is very robust and blooms forever.

White Yarrow is found along sides of roads and grows almost anywhere....except my garden! I've had a hard time getting it to bloom but, here it is in all it's glory!

All of the Yarrow in the garden are fernleaf which is so pretty on it's own. This little number nearly didn't make it. Being a rescue plant it wasn't in the best condition when I bought it but, it has rallied and is doing well.

Butterfly Weed.....it's so pretty and bright and the pollinators love it. It's easy to grow from seed and spreads like crazy because it's from the milkweed family.

Spiderwort or Widow's Tears are lovely. The white one above has a purple flower.....the blue/purple one below is almost florescent.


Surprise! A Columbine still blooming!

Needle-leaf Coreopsis is full of buds and they are slowly opening.

Campion in Rose and white. In mixing them together, I'm hoping to get some pink ones of various shades.

Shasta Daisies are so incredibly white and pristine when they first open up.

f/everfew has been in my yard and growing wildly for years before I took some for the garden.

I can't remember the name of this diminutive flower. It grows on slender stems and likes to push itself up though other plants and poke out. 
You can see by the above and below pictures that the "Susans" are blooming. Many of them were eaten down to the nub by the woodchuck and  won't be blooming anytime soon.




Evening Primrose adds color close to the ground.

Variegated Ox-eye Daisy

For the purpose of making the flowers happy, there was a rain storm last night. And, today is one of those incredibly beautiful and comfortable summer days that seem to be few and far between. The sun is bright, the sky is a perfect color blue with puffy clouds all around, there's a mild breeze and the temperatures are in the 70's F with low humidity. I couldn't ask for better weather. 
Today, I'm grateful for The Saver. He's a jack of all trades and a master of many. If it wasn't for his know-how and desire to make me happy (happy wife, happy life;), I wouldn't have my lovely gardens to play in.

Happy Gardening, 
Sally

Don't forget to visit  Gail at   http://www.clayandlimestone.com/      
to see what's happening with wildflowers all over the world.

5 comments:

  1. Did I understand you correctly, does the spiderwort have two different colored flowers, one is purple and two are white? Is this usual or did it just happen to grow like this?
    Jeannie
    GetMeToTheCountry.Blogspot.com

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    1. I think it's a mixture of two different plants....one white and one purple....They can mix together, though. I have a friend who has all different shades of white/pink/purple.(They mingle)

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    2. I like it. More for your money!
      Jeannie
      GetMeToTheCountry.Blogspot.com

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  2. Some lovely blooms! I love flowers that keep giving and seed themselves (politely) around the garden. I have found that white yarrow is quite weedy (I got some from another gardener, but ended up pulling it all out), but I grew a pink and red mixture from seeds one year and it seeds some lovely ones around the garden. Black eyed susans are one of my favorites, but I do worry that the groundhogs will find them.

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    1. We had a woodchuck (groundhog) devour the Echinachea and some Susans this spring. Some of the Echinachea is about 8" tall and budding up. Looks like the Susans will recover but not sure if they will bloom. Left some unsightly bare spots I'm not happy about.

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